Nicolas Cage is a Coppola?!

That’s right folks, Nic Cage is a Coppola. If you’re like a lot of people I’ve talked to, you’ve probably always had a love/unimpressed relationship with Cage’s acting. He’s very hit or miss for me but, although he’s not in any of my favorite movies, he is in quite a few movies that I do enjoy, including his acting in them. Some of those movies include Adaptation., Joe, The Wicker Man, Matchstick Men and, most recently, Moonstruck, which was unexpectedly deep. Of course, I did also enjoy Cage in Con Air, The Rock and Face/Off but that was before I had developed a discerning nature in regard to movies – I mean, I was still in high school. You can’t expect too much from teenager me. I still enjoy those movies on a nostalgic level but, you have to admit, Cage’s acting in those movies is effing terrible.I know a lot of you are probably thinking “What about Leaving Las Vegas?!” Well, I haven’t watched it yet but it is on my list! Don’t worry, I’ll get there eventually.

When it comes to art, you develop a type of trust with the artists. Actors and actresses who consistently choose interesting, endearing, believable, difficult movies and roles for themselves are the ones that build trust with you over time and the ones whom you don’t hesitate to go to the theatre for when they’ve come out with a new project. I believe it was Benicio del Toro that said when you choose a role, you are choosing the movie too so you can’t always pick a role you want to play and expect the movie to be amazing even if the character is. Nic Cage just hasn’t maintained that trust with the roles and movies he chooses so I tend to be wary of his art.

Back to my point, according to IMDB and Wikipedia, Nic Cage, born Nicolas Kim Coppola, changed his name early in his career to avoid the appearance of nepotism. Nicolas, or as his Moonstruck co-star Cher calls him, Nicky wanted to make his own path in the acting world. For those of you still asking yourself why this matters, let’s talk a little about Francis Ford Coppola, Nick’s uncle on his father’s side. Francis is an Academy Award winning screenplay writer and director. You may know him for movies like the Godfather Parts I, II and III, Apocalypse Now, The RainMaker and Patton. He’s part of what is considered the New Hollywood wave of filmmaking where the film vision was the director’s rather than that of the studios. Without the pioneers of this movement, we’d have a lot less of the movies that move us and a lot more Face/Off-type movies. Big Hollywood studios had their specific genres that they tended to gear their films toward and their main objective was sales rather than art. With the directors at the helm of their creative vision, rather than the studios, we started to hear more individualized voices coming from Hollywood in addition to the churning of the Hollywood movie machine which, I believe, a lot of us are learning to or have already been ignoring in search of movies that we see ourselves in. Movies that really touch us rather than just entertain us.

Also familiar to me, and maybe I did pay attention to her at first because of her name, is Sofia Coppola, Francis’ daughter. Sofia is known for her Academy Award winning screenplay for the comedy-drama Lost in Translation. Of course, there is also Jason Schwartzman, Sofia and Nic’s cousin, who is frequently involved in the beloved Wes Anderson’s films and is one of the stars in, one of my personal favorites, Steve Martin’s Shopgirl.

I totally agree that winning Academy Awards is not the definition of being a great artist and Nic himself is a Best Actor winner for Leaving Las Vegas. It can also be argued that not everything Nic’s relatives put out there is gold but the caliber of most of Cage’s movies, especially ones he’s known for in the ’90’s, are not quite up to par with a lot of the art being created by some of his family members so when I read that he was part of the Coppola family, I was a little – okay a lot – taken aback. I respect a variety of Nic’s role choices especially in more recent years and I have to give him props for intentionally striking out on his own to see what he was capable of. We can all learn a lesson from his choice to go after what he wanted in the face of uncertainty. That being said, I still won’t be watching more than half of the movies he’s made and I watch A LOT of movies.

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